Running

Three Valid Reasons Why You Hate Running

  

But, you still kinda wanna get into it...

Oh girl, you are not alone. I've had tons of friends and clients over the years who've felt the same way you do. They kinda hate running. But, they still feel like it's something they'd like to get into, or at least should be able to do.

Many of them have even made numerous attempts to pick up the habit - investing in top-of-the-line kicks and using the most highly rated run programs - only to be disappointed by increased aches and pains, very little progress, and even less enthusiasm. 

First off, let's be clear. If you really don't want to run, there are plenty of other ways you can get cardiovascular benefit and keep your heart healthy. You don't have to run.

So, Why Should You Run?

However, I will tell you this. You absolutely SHOULD be able to sprint. No, we're not exactly living in a world where you're being chased down by predators(although, my last boss was pretty creepy), but you may need to hustle to that 1 train before the doors smash into your ribcage. Ok, maybe that's just New York, but I'm sure you can think of a few scenarios in your own life where a better gait would come in handy. Sprinting is something we're meant to do.

And, I also happen to believe a 5K is a reasonable endurance test for any fit person. I'm not saying you should go out and run a marathon. Progressing from your couch to 26.2 miles is actually the opposite of health. But, training to run 3 miles will get your energy systems in tip-top shape; and I think that attribute fits everyone's abstract ideas of what makes one "fit."

So, if running is so good for you - and it is - then why do you hate it so much? Well, contrary to what you probably tell yourself,  it's not because you don't have enough willpower, or whatever bogus self-shaming thought crosses your mind. 

As a former track coach and strength and conditioning specialist, I've seen what passes as a typical 5k training plan in the magazines and running websites, and uhhh... they're mostly terrible. 

There are a few problems I see with most running programs, and any one of them could result in a crippling lack of motivation. 

Let's talk about the most important ones:

It's Boring

Running endless miles at slow speeds for days on end is both tedious and boring. But more importantly, this method prescribed by most running magazines, is really not effective at building you the specific speed and endurance necessary for a 5k. Your workouts should include varying bouts of intensity and time that result in both efficient cardiovascular improvements, and more interesting and fun challenges. A mere ladder of increasing bouts of running will not produce good enough results to justify your efforts.

2. It Feels Like You're Dying
It is completely valid that you don't like feeling like your heart is going to explode out of your chest, or that your legs feel like a hundred pounds of dead weight being dragged along with you. And both are signs that you're training in suboptimal conditions. Your workouts should have very specific intensity prescriptions and appropriate parameters to ensure that your training is making your body stronger and better, not weaker and overly stressed. If your running gets worse as the workout continues, it's not a good workout. 

3. It Makes Your Joints Hurt
If you experience excessive aches, or pain in your joints during or after running, you may have another indicator that your workouts are too stressful for your current level of ability, or just poorly programmed from the get-go. Proper progression is key. And it's not just your heart and lungs that need to be built up incrementally, but also the capacity of your legs. Your training should factor in muscular endurance so that your workouts are pain free. And an  appropriate strength training program should be completed in tandem with your running workouts to build resilience. 

So maybe you do ACTUALLY hate running. You hate the way you've gone about it in the past. But, if you still find the idea of running for fitness COMPELLING, I can tell you there is a better way -  a way that will help you get definitively stronger, faster, and even leaner... and I've got the solution.

My 12-week training program STRONG ENOUGH TO RUN combines intuitive speed workouts with specific strength training to help you start a running regimen. Take an extra $10 off with code SPRING5K and get started on your plan today!

Come on. Let's give this thing one last shot.

Get a Running Start On Your New Year’s Goals

This Is Your Year

It’s no surprise that starting a running regime tops the charts as the #1 goal of fitness seekers. Not only is running a great way to get fit and lose weight, but it’s also just a great deal. If you’ve got the will and a pair of running shoes(which can be easily purchased on close-out sale with all those holiday gift cards you’ve acquired), you can start immediately, no joiners’ fee or long-term contract required.

These benefits are enough for most to strap on their kicks and get started. But, there are also a slough of other perks that will not only increase your ROI, but also keep you motivated to stay consistent. And we all know that consistency is key when it comes to long term success with any goal, particularly in the business of fitness.

Contemplating your own New Year’s Resolutions? Unlike most trend-following fit pros, I encourage any of my clients who have interest, to get running. And I help them do just so. Here’s why…

Running Is The Best Form of Rhythmic Cardio

This fact gets easily overlooked but the truth stands: Lifting weights faster does not fulfill all of your cardio requirements. HIIT workouts done with strength moves will certainly make the walls of your heart stronger. Your heart will need to work hard to pump blood to your body and adapt accordingly. But this is just one half of the cardio equation.

When prolonged tension is placed on your blood vessels(as with lifting weights), blood flow back to the heart is actually restricted. And the walls of your heart will not adapt and EXPAND over time correspondingly as they should in relation to the thickening of the walls we just covered. This creates an increase in pressure that can actually put you at higher risk for cardiac episodes. 

Running however, does improve your heart health more completely. The sequencing of muscles during the motion actually allows for increased venus return to the heart, forcing that expansion of the ventricles that your heart needs to stay strong and healthy. 

So, if you’ve been thinking you should add some cardio into your fitness routine, you probably should. And running is a perfect way to get all the benefits your heart desires. 

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Running Will Give You That “Fit” Look

Yeah, you know what I mean here. That lean but shredded physique that gives the impression that you could rock a red carpet, but also crush a quick 10K if you needed to straight after. Defined, but not necessarily jacked.

This physique phenomenon is not a genetic anomaly, but merely the result of improved glycogen storage in your muscles. Glycogen is a source of energy for your body. This little adaptation occurs from the result of endurance work, not from heavy lifting as you might imagine. Although, it’s important to know you’ll need strength training to ensure there’s muscle to be pumped in the first place.

When your body is asked to do prolonged bouts of works, it must begin to use glycogen as fuel, instead of just ATP(bio lab flashback!). That glycogen that’s stored in your muscles has certain H2O binding factors that help it give you a “shredded” look. Yes, your body depletes it during the run, but going forward, your body learns to become more efficient and keeps better stores on the daily. Those glycogen molecules will in turn rip more water from underneath your skin and suck it into your muscles, further defining those lines that make us look “fit.”

So, if you’ve been hoping to fend off the fluffier look you normally rock in the colder months(those hibernation instincts are strong in 14-degree cold of New Jersey), running can give you that bikini-ready look in March.

Running Helps Your Brain Become More Resilient

Yes, we all know that exercise helps release some feel-good hormones that can help you deal with chronic mental health issues like depression and anxiety. But, running also releases the chemical norepinephrine. 

Norepinephrine is a neurotransmitter, but it’s also an important hormone present during the body’s stress response - your “fight or flight” mode. Running has been shown to increase the production and storage of norepinephrine, effectively allowing your body to manage it’s response to physical and mental stress better. 

So, if you feel you’ve been dealing with stress poorly or you know you’ve got a tough couple of months coming up, starting a running regimen can be a great way to troubleshoot or preventatively balance. 

Get a Program

All of these potential benefits from running paint a very bright future. But, it’s all just speculation until you actually get rolling. You’ve got to be consistent with your efforts and meticulous in your planning. You could just hit the road and start logging miles without any more awareness or knowledge, but this is how most fitness seekers drop off by February. 

You need a program that will keep your mind motivated and your body strong. Ready to finally tackle that mental block that seems to get in your way every year? Get STRONG ENOUGH TO RUN on sale now and find your inner runner.

Learn more by clicking the link above or purchase before the sale ends here!

How To Get Strong Enough To Run

Strength Training For Running 101 - Trunk Stability

In-person and online distance coaching clients included, many of my lovelies like to use running as a means for improving fitness. It’s an economic and effective choice.. Running is what we call in the industry a “low-barrier-of-entry sport,” - i.e. something that requires small financial investment and little or no facility/equipment requirements. That sounds great, right? Fitness should be available to all.

HOWEVER, the ease with which we have access to running sometimes tricks us into believing there’s no major pre-requisites in terms of skill either. And unfortunately, that just ain’t true.

In order to withstand the repeated stress of running and reap all the potential benefits—and yes, there are many reasons to run—your body needs to be strong in all the right places. There are certain strengths REQUIRED before starting a running regimen.

Getting stronger in order to run better is an easy concept to grasp. “But, strong in what ways,” you may ask? Well, that my dear is a very good question. Cause you certainly don’t need to go wasting your time with bicep curls and tricep push-downs, as I see lots of cardio queens toiling over in the weight room.

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You need to focus on developing certain qualities that will have better impact on your readiness for running like plyometric and deceleration training. You’ll also benefit from lower body mobility and strength training.

We can get into those concepts more at a later time(shout me out @ashleighkast if you have interest), but right now we’re gonna talk about the most important quality you should work on first - the one that is going to influence your success through all the others - and that is trunk stability.

I'm going to give you one bit of magic that will help you increase your trunk stability - which by the way is important for EVERYONE, not just runners - but first, let's talk about what it is.

Ok, what is trunk stability?

Trunk stability is what you may really be imagining when you think about “core training." You know that your trunk is your body—your torso without the appendages. So trunk stability is then defined as your ability to keep your torso stable throughout any given movement—moving with integrity and honoring the way the joints work there.

Why is this so important to me? 

Well, for our purposes, we’re going to focus on the lower part of your spine. As you run, you need to be able to keep your lumbar spine and your pelvis stable…

To Improve Your Mobility

Proximal Stability Leads To Distal Mobility. What leads to what? Ok. let’s break this loaded statement down. Cause it’s actually a lot simpler than it sounds. When we say “proximal” we mean towards the midline of your body i.e. your trunk. When we say “distal” we are referring to joints further away from your midline, like in this particular case - your hips.

So what we’re saying is:

If you can create a more stabile environment throughout your trunk, you can gain better mobility through your hips without doing a single isolated stretch. 

And that increased mobility can potentially lead to a WAY more efficient stride. With a more efficient stride, you’ll be able to run faster with less effort. That sounds good, right?

To Breathe More Efficiently

Your diaphragm is primarily a respiratory muscle. Everyone knows that. However, the diaphragm also plays a significant role in your postural stability, including the lumbo-pelvic complex we’re focusing on. As you engage in more strenuous workouts, the priority of the diaphragm needs to shift to that cardio focus. But you’ll need to have enough strength in other supporting muscles like the pelvic floor and the transverse abdomens in order to continue breathing optimally as the threshold shifts. 

So what we’re saying here is:

If you can challenge your trunk stability and in turn strengthen all those muscles involved in that task, you can be more efficient with your breathing pattern as you run.

With a better breathing pattern, you can run at higher speeds and you can run for extended time. 

To Lessen Your Risk Of Injury

We mentioned this before, but you need to honor the way you were made to move and therefore respect the function of your joints. As we said, your lumbar spine and your pelvis need to be more stabile and your hips need to be more mobile. Dishonoring of that relationship will result in unnecessary stress on joints that can't handle it. And more than likely, you'll run into lower back stiffness or pain first.

So what we’re saying is:

If you can challenge your trunk stability and strengthen your joints PROPERLY, you can build the capacity in your trunk and lower body to withstand the stress of running.

With the right strength, you can ensure your benefit is higher than your cost, and get better every year without being sidelined.

How can I start working on my trunk stability?

You can start building better core strength for running right now by training in the half-kneeling position. This posture works great because it not only mirrors what happens when you run (putting one hip in flexion and one in extension), but it's also simply difficult to screw up. You'll know if you're not getting it right because you will lose your balance and fall over. That doesn't sound nice. But the results from challenging half-kneeling are VERY NICE.

Start with these three:

Half Kneeling Chop

Chop the cable down and across your body as you keep your hips unmoving.

Half Kneeling Lift

Lift the cable up and across your body as you keep hips unmoving.

Half Kneeling Belly Press

Press the cable straight in front of you while keeping hips unmoving.

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Three Valid Reasons You Don't Like Running

But, you still kinda wanna get into it...

Oh girl, you are not alone. I've had tons of friends and clients over the years who've felt the same way. They kinda hate running. But, they still feel like it's something they'd like to get into, or at least should be able to do.

Many of them have even made numerous attempts to pick up the habit - investing in top-of-the-line kicks and using the most highly rated run programs - only to be disappointed by increased aches and pains, very little progress, and even less enthusiasm. 

First off, let's be clear. If you really don't want to run, there are plenty of other ways you can get cardiovascular benefit and keep your heart healthy. 

However, I will tell you this. You absolutely SHOULD be able to sprint. We're not exactly living in a world where you're being chased down by predators, but you may need to hustle to that 1 train before the doors smash into your ribcage. Ok, maybe that's just New York, but I'm sure you can think of a scenario where sprinting comes in handy as well. Sprinting is something we're meant to do.

And, I also happen to believe a 5K is a reasonable endurance test for any fit person. I'm not saying you should go out and run a marathon. Progressing from your couch to 26.2 miles is actually the opposite of health. But, training to run 3 miles will get your energy systems in tip-top shape; and I think that attribute fits everyone's abstract ideas of what makes one "fit."

So, if running is so good for you - and it is - then why do you hate it so much? Well, contrary to what you probably tell yourself,  it's not because you don't have enough willpower, or whatever bogus self-shaming thought crosses your mind. 

As a former track coach and strength and conditioning specialist, I've seen what passes as a typical 5k training plan in the magazines and running websites, and uhhh... they're mostly bullshit. 

There are a plethora of common problems I see with most programs, and any one of them could result in a crippling lack of motivation. 

Let's talk about the most important ones:

It's Boring

Running endless miles at slow speeds for days on end is both tedious and boring. But more importantly, this method prescribed by most running magazines, is really not effective at building you the specific speed and endurance necessary for a 5k. Your workouts should include varying bouts of intensity and time that result in both efficient cardiovascular improvements, and more interesting and fun challenges. A mere ladder of increasing bouts of running will not produce good enough results to justify your efforts.

2. It feels like you're dying
It is completely valid that you don't like feeling like your heart is going to explode out of your chest, or that your legs feel like a hundred pounds of dead weight being dragged along with you. And both are signs that you're training in suboptimal conditions. Your workouts should have very specific intensity prescriptions and appropriate parameters to ensure that your training is making your body stronger and better, not weaker and overly stressed. If your running gets worse as the workout continues, it's not a good workout. 

3. It makes your joints hurt
If you experience excessive aches or pain in your joints during or after running, you may have another indicator that your workouts are too stressful for your current level of ability, or just poorly programmed from the get-go. Proper progression is key. And it's not just your heart and lungs that need to be built up, but also the capacity of your legs. Your training should factor in muscular endurance so that your workouts are pain free. And an  appropriate strength training program should be completed in tandem with your running workouts to build your resilience. 

So maybe you do ACTUALLY hate running. But, if you still find the idea of running for fitness COMPELLING, but one of the above reasons has been holding you back... well then I've got the solution.

And this 12-week comprehensive strength training and running program is only on sale for $39 until Sunday. 

Come on. Let's give this thing one last shot.

Running Requisites

When contemplating a running program, the question that often comes to mind first, is “Where do I start?”

I mean, you inherently know you cannot just go out and run a marathon on day one. 

So you vow to be sensible. You grab the latest issue of Runners’ World or Google the best beginners’ 5K program you can find.

You might even buy yourself brand new Nike’s to protect your joints or a cute new Lululemon outfit to get motivated.

You promise to follow the plan and take things slow.

You think you’re doing all the right things. You’re being responsible.

But, what if I told you, you’ve likely already jumped the gun?

Hold up, WHAT?

Your Body Needs Preparation

September is like the second coming of the new year for fitness. The weather is just right to lace up your kicks and get outside. It feels unquestionably like the perfect time to get started on some new goal.

Your mind is definitely poised for the challenge. But maybe your body is not is not so prepared. 

Just as a football player needs to have a certain amount of skills to cut down the field, a runner also requires some foundational strengths to traverse the trails or hit the pavement.

Like any other sport, running is stressful, and in a repetitive fashion.

Your body needs to be resilient enough to withstand that stress and strong enough to power you through the mileage with relatively good mechanics.

So before we get into what you need. We must talk about what running actually is.

 

What Is Running?

As we said, running is repetitive. One run of any distance, is a very, very, very long series of single-leg hops from one leg to the other.

That means you’ve got to be able to complete a real nice hop. And repeat.

So you need all the components of this skill. Lower body joints that work really nice. Hamstrings and calves that can withstand heavy loads. Trunk stability to keep you from leaking efficiency. And then the related strength to keep executing it well.

These components of preparedness are necessary to ensure that along the way of your fitness journey, you don’t hit the wall with an unexpected injury.

As many of my new clients were surprised to discover, running does not have to, and should not hurt. And it is absolutely possible to get more fit without that seemingly inevitable breakdown. 

For real.

 

You Need Skills

So I’ve enlisted the help of my good friend and colleague, Dr. Kyle Balzer, to compile a list of skills that we believe, are good indicators of a potential athlete’s readiness to run. And this includes the more casual recreational runner as well. You don't have to be a competitive athlete to call yourself a runner.

It all starts with showing up to the line with the right running requisites. How do we know what we're talking about?

Kyle is a Doctor of Physical Therapy and Board Certified Sports Clinical Specialist, with specific expertise in ensuring athletes return to the field or gym in better condition than ever; and helping clients who are injured, continue to train.

I myself am a highly qualified running coach. I’ve studied intensively under the LSU track coaches with special focus on the sprints. I’ve been around Olympic athletes in the gym. And I’ve coached cross country and track and field teams with great success, due mostly to getting my high school girls STRONG. 

Before you begin to run…

 

You should be able to forward lunge…

And what we’re really focusing on here is ankle mobility. If your ankles are locked up tight, you’re going to find lunging and running to be very tough endeavors.

How can you be sure that your joints are working well? Use a simple half kneeling assessment. Position your forward foot 4 inches from the wall. While keeping your heel down and the knee moving straight forward, can you reach the wall? 

Kyle adds that perhaps asymmetry between the two assessments is even more important. ROM in both should be within 5-10% of each other. 

What to do if they are not symmetrical or close to that 4 inches? You might want to check in with a good clinician like Kyle, or even an experienced and educated trainer to figure out why your ankles aren't moving adequately.

If you are not experiencing pain, you can also try working on the following mobility drill.

 

You should be able to load up a deadlift…

And what we’re really focusing on with this one is your ability to hinge well from the hips (as opposed to the waist), to ensure stride efficiency. And the ability to load up the legs and build strength to withstand the stressful and repetitive nature of running.

The deadlift, and all it's lateralizations, is super important for building that posterior chain strength that many runners are lacking.

Kyle points out that the single-leg version has even greater carryover. Runners should have great balance on both legs independently prior to getting started.  If that stability is present, single-leg deadlifting is a great way to build capacity within the tissue involved in single-leg landing.

Here is my absolute favorite cue for a successful single-leg deadlift.

 

You should be able to land a single leg hop…

Once you can  balance and then deadlift on a single leg, you can progress the challenge with jump training. We said running is a series of single-leg hops. So you better be able to execute one.

Kyle says plyometrics are great for creating the adaptations runners need for their sport, like creating power and absorbing stress. Hopping, bounding, and skipping are all great progressions that you can practice in the gym.

The video below is from my exercise library on YouTube. Hop out to a distance you can land successfully. Push the limit a little bit further when the hop becomes easy.

 

You should be able to dead bug like a pro…

As Kyle points out, running doesn’t require a whole lot of upper body strength. But it does require you to be able to dissociate or separate your shoulder and arms from your torso. And specifically in a reciprocal and alternating fashion. That means you need to be able to move your arms independently of your body. A dead bug requires you to do just that. Can you say core stability

Here I show you what to focus on in your dead bug practice.

 

Now let's be clear! Kyle is a doctor. But this check-list by no means serves as a doctor's clearance. If you've got major issues going on, or you're working through an injury, be sure to check in with a qualified professional IN PERSON.

We do however, wholeheartedly believe, that for the average recreational to competitive runner, proficiency in these skills can keep you much happier and healthier on the path to fitness or performance.

And contrary to current trending beliefs, running is a completely valid and useful way to increase your fitness. You just better be ready for it.

 

For more nutrition advice, fitness articles, and workout sign up for my newsletter. You'll also be the first to get access to the second round of the Sophisticated Stride Coaching Group for runners.

Are Your Ankles Adequate?

And What To Do If They Are NOt!

Lunges are necessary—The split stance should never be ignored. And I don't care what anybody says on that particular subject. Front squats are a great introduction to the world of barbell lifts—the one true 8-minute ab workout among the gimmicks. Sprints are theoretically the best choice for cardio—and can turn you into a fat-burning machine.

All three of these exercises have two things in common. The first is that they are all simple but excellent staples, that merit a place in any good training program. From fat-loss to core strength, they all hit the marks with multiple shots.

The second, is that they require a certain amount of mobility to be completed successfully. Lunges, front squats, and sprints all require you to have ankles that move pretty damn well.

And bad ankles affect more of the population than you might think. It’s kind of a hidden problem because tight, locked up ankles typically don’t result in pain at the site. It’s a rare occasion that any client ever comes to me actually complaining of ankle pain.

Limited ankle mobility affects other joints, and shows itself as seemingly unrelated issues. So it can be really difficult to realize unless you actually measure it.

Clients DO often complain of knee pain during lunging.They experience back pain after goblet or front squats. And I’ve seen a slew of runners with frequent ankle sprains. These are merely possible clues. But, any one of these issues could prompt an ankle investigation. 

The simplest way to know? You don’t need a kinesiology degree to dig a little deeper. You just need a dowel(could be the swiffer mop in the closet) and a ruler(your phone works fine. An iPhone6 is about 5 and a half inches long for reference).

How To Know If Your Ankles Need Work

Now, should you find that your ankle mobility is less than stellar—as you learned from the video, a distance from the wall of less than four inches, you need to work on your ankles before you jump into any of the aforementioned exercises. 

In the meantime, you can swing and snatch yourself silly. Do all of the deadlifts. And any upper body stuff is of course fair game. Simultaneously, you’ll be working towards earning your sprints and front squats back. 

Here is a quick routine to run through, with a bonus exercise at the end after you’ve been working for about two weeks(every day 2x a day or 4weeks 1x a day).

**Should you find that one ankle is tighter than the other, you'll complete 50-100% more work on the challenging side.

***THIS IS SUPER IMPORTANT! If you experience closing joint PAIN-- and that means that as you push the knee further in that ankle mobility assessment and the front side of your ankle hurts--DO NOT try this routine. DO NOT even bother reading the rest of this blog. Proceed to your nearest body work professional. This is not going to work for you and might make the situation worse. 

If everything feels good, let's get going!

(1) Foam Roll Calves

As we covered in the last blog, we don't necessarily know why it works, but foam-rolling the calves can get you a little more range of motion in a snap.

(2) Stretch Calves

Push into the wall as you drive the heel back into the floor. Make sure that foot is straight and hold for thirty seconds.

(3) Mobilize Ankle

This is my go to mobilization if I know my client is going to be working out alone. All you need is a sturdy band and an anchor to tie it to.

Post stretching and foam rolling, you should have gained more flexibility. Now move through it! 8-10 strides is perfect.

(4) Core-Activated Hurdle Hold

This one can seem kind of silly. You might even get into the hold and think, What's happening here? Where's the work?

The feedback from the cables(or a band works here too!) teaches you to push into the ground with the standing leg and elongate your body, creating space in the joints. In yoga, we call this rooting to rise.

All of our joints work better when there is adequate space to move properly. Including those pesky ankles that can get otherwise squashed in single-leg balances. LENGTHEN.

If you pay attention to this subtle activation, you'll learn to apply the concept to the next two exercises...

And maybe EVERYTHING you ever do. And then maybe EVERYTHING you do gets better as you set yourself up for increased core stability with this one simple cue. BOOM. Automatic sophistication. You can stop reading now. Ok, just kidding.

(5) Assisted Split Hold

OK, Ok I know we said lunges will cause you problems if you have tight ankles. 

But! If we dial it back down and regress our split stance to an isometric hold, and we take off some of the load by adding assistance, you should be able to find the perfect first challenge. 

Progressively load the ankle by using the straps less and less as the exercise becomes easier. Thirty seconds on a hold is great.

(6) Squat Toe-Touch*

*To be completed only after progress has been made and confirmed by reassessment. 

Not to be confused with a typical bend-patterned toe-touch. Don't worry about hinging back. I want you to drop that booty for 8 reps on this one.

I also want you to look for a lot of ankle dorsiflexion i.e. push that knee forward to challenge your new range of motion. 

And move slow! Speed makes everything harder. A four count down and a four count back up, minimizing any shift on the foot as much as possible to be successful. A loss of balance is an indicator to you that your learning speed may be slower than you think.

And finally, remember that space concept from the hurdle holds? Root to rise! 

The Program

(1) Foam Roll Calves (60sec)

(2) Stretch Calves (30sec)

(3) Band Ankle Mobilizations (x8-10 strides)

(4) Core-Activated Hurdle Hold (30-60sec)

(5) Assisted Split Hold (30sec)

*(6) Squat Toe-Touch (8 reps) After clear progress has been measured

 

Now, once you get to that magic 4-inch mark, don't just jump right back into long sprints and heavy front squats and loaded bulgarian split-squats.

Adding load and jumping ahead too quickly is a sure-fire way to negate your progress.

Start with short sprints. Begin with unloaded split-squats and lunges. Stick to easy reps on the front squats. 

The benefits don't just stop here. Your single-leg lifts should all benefit from the ankle work. And you may even find your glutes engage a little bit better as well. As your newly named glute goddess, I know a thing . 

#adequateankles #sophisticatedstrength

Running Is Not Making You Fat

…but maybe the way you're going about it is

Running is getting a bad name. Lean body-builders are bragging about their cardio-free routines. Righteous personal trainers are telling magazines that running makes you fat. And fitness brands are selling t-shirt with slogans like “I don’t run” everywhere you look.

This is getting out of hand. Running is my oldest fitness friend. Coaching track was really my entrance into the fitness industry. Like a true friend, running has supported me through so much life stress. And running has helped me get back to the fighting weight that makes me happy. I can’t have these people talking about him this way.